Events

A. Quinn Jones, Black Education, and HBCUs

in partnership with the A. Quinn Jones Museum & Cultural Center

with John Dukes III, Wayne Fields, Dr. Desta Meghoo, and Carol Richardson

Thursday, September 23

7:30pm

FREE admission but registration is required (in-person and virtual)

Florida is home to four historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs): Bethune-Cookman University, Edward Waters University, Florida A&M University, and Florida Memorial University. The Matheson History Museum and A. Quinn Jones Museum & Cultural Center invite you to join them on Thursday, September 23, at 7:30pm at the Matheson to celebrate the life of A. Quinn Jones, a HBCU graduate, and the impact that HBCUs continue to have on our state and community.

The evening will begin with a performance by the Richard E. Parker Alumni Band. Mr. Ken Simmons, president of the Bethune-Cookman University Alumni Chapter of Gainesville, will be our host. Speakers John Dukes III, Wayne Fields, Dr. Desta Meghoo, and Carol Richardson will share about A. Quinn Jones, the history of Black education, and an inside look at HBCUs.

For the safety of staff and attendees, capacity will be limited to 50 people and masks are required. Admission is free but registration is required: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-quinn-jones-black-education-and-hbcus-tickets-168939944923. A virtual option via Zoom is available for those who cannot attend in person: https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN__Wu9jaMURxaZymMyomsyFQ.


Florida’s Negro War: Black Seminoles and the Second Seminole War

with Dr. Anthony Dixon

Saturday, November 13

4pm

FREE but registration is required (virtual only)

Author and historian Dr. Anthony Dixon will join us virtually via Zoom webinar to share about his book Florida’s Negro War: Black Seminoles and the Second Seminole War on Saturday, November 13 at 4pm.

Registration is free: https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_dWq35I5sSuuHFggfPBOc5A.

From 1817 to 1858, the United States government engaged in a bitter conflict with the Seminole Nation. This conflict would result in three distinct wars. The Second Seminole War (1835-1842) was conducted under the Indian Removal Policy of the 1830’s. This war was a result of the American plantation societies’ relentless efforts to enslave the Black Seminole population. The United States government’s objective became to return as many Black Seminoles as possible, if not all, to slavery.

Evidence proves that the efforts of the U.S. military to place Blacks in bondage were not only a major underlying theme throughout the War, but at various points, the primary goal. It is clear that from the onset of the war, the United States government, military, and state militias grossly underestimated both the determination and the willingness of the Black Seminole to resist at all costs. Thus, this book not only makes the argument that the Second Seminole War was indeed a slave rebellion, but perhaps the most successful one in United States history.


Punkhouse in the Deep South: The Oral History of 309

with Aaron Cometbus and Scott Satterwhite

Wednesday, October 13

7pm

FREE admission but registration is required (in-person only)

Join us in-person at the Matheson to hear from authors Aaron Cometbus and Scott Satterwhite as they share about their book Punkhouse in the Deep South. In their presentation, Cometbus and Sattewhite discuss the history of the famed “309 Punkhouse,” while shedding light on the largely ignored lives of average punks, living in the oldest punkhouse in the South.

For the safety of staff and attendees, capacity will be limited to 50 people and masks are required. Admission is free but registration is required: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/punkhouse-in-the-deep-south-the-oral-history-of-309-registration-164919557837.

Told in personal interviews, Punkhouse in the Deep South is the collective story of a punk community in an unlikely town and region, a hub of radical counterculture that drew artists and musicians from throughout the conservative South and earned national renown.           

The house at 309 6th Avenue was a crossroads for punk rock, activism, veganism, and queer culture in Pensacola, a quiet Gulf Coast city at the border of Florida and Alabama. In this book, residents of 309 narrate the colorful and often comical details of communal life in the crowded and dilapidated house over its 30-year existence. Terry Johnson, Ryan “Rymodee” Modee, Gloria Diaz, Skott Cowgill, and others tell of playing in bands including This Bike Is a Pipe Bomb, operating local businesses such as End of the Line Cafe, forming feminist support groups, and creating zines and art.

Featured image: Author and historian Lizzie Robinson Jenkins, courtesy of Cool Blue Photography